Summer in Vienna, part three

The Viennese are world-renowned for their sort of macabre disposition. My siblings and I felt very Viennese last wekend, so we decided to visit the Kapuzinergruft (Imperial Crypt), where most members of the Habsburg family are buried. Well, not exactly buried, really. More like exhibited.

Kapuzinergruft Pietà
Why this Pietà near the entrance is crushing the heads of babies is beyond me.
Emperor Franz I Stephan and Empress Maria Theresia
Emperor Franz I Stephan and Empress Maria Theresia
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Another detail of the sarcophagus of Emperor Franz I Stephan and Empress Maria Theresia. Gives the word "stick figure" a whole new meaning.
Karl VI
This skull wearing the crown of the Holy Roman Empire is mounted on the sarcophagus of Emperor Karl VI. Note how a few teeth are missing. Creepy.

Summer in Vienna, part two

Riesenrad
The Riesenrad is a wonderful example for 19th century engineering. People sometimes compare it unfavorably to the London Eye, which is twice its height. But think of it this way: It's only a few years younger than the Eiffel Tower, and it moves.
Schnbrunn Front
Najad
I just stood there and thought how I envied that najad.
Roman Ruin
The so-called Roman Ruin isn't actually Roman. It was built in the 18th century.
Schönbrunn Back
Ugh! A baroque garden. What a cruel way to treat mother nature!
Schlosspark
The parks behind the castle are quite extensive, and beautiful, once you get past the baroque rosebeds and trees aligned with military precision.

Summer in Vienna

A few pictures I made today on a walk through the city.

Living Sculpture: Driving in Bronze
Living Sculpture: Driving Bronze
Living Sculpture: Dancing Silver
Living Sculpture: Dancing Silver
Living Sculpture: Empty Gold
Living Sculpture: Empty Gold

The hailstorm a couple days ago killed a few trees.
Burggarten: The hailstorm a couple days ago killed a few trees.
Burggarten: Emperor Franz I.
Burggarten: Emperor Franz I.
So close, and yet so far away.
So close, and yet so far away.